Posts Tagged: Photowalks

Photowalk in the 1920s: Dadaocheng Costume Parade – October 14th 2018

Outline of Walk

Inviting Photowalkers to attend the next Photowalk on October 14th at Beimen MRT Station, where we’ll be participating in the 1920’s Costume Parade from Beimen to Yongle Market Plaza.

“In 2018, the Yongle Market Plaza is transformed into the Time Machine Theater, which re-creates scenes from that era. Bring your roaring 20s spirit and dress up in costumes reminiscent of that era, as you get ready to travel back in time to Dadaocheng’s heyday!”

Photowalkers will be organizing a Photowalk to coincide with, that may draw upon and be inspired by, this costume parade: Obviously the date is 10/14 but the final details are still undecided! Keep uptodate on the Photowalkers Group:

The Basics

Getting There
Take the MRT to the Taipei Station. The meet up point is Exit #4 at the West Side of Taipei Main Station (not the MRT Station) at 1:00pm~1:15pm. We’re walking to Beimen from there, it’s not far!

Route Plan

It’s pretty much decided by the Parade, but feel free to explore alleys and sidewalks off the main parade direction! Our basic route is expected to be:

route

The calendar of events continues into the early evening with shows and performances. While they may be interesting or enjoyable to watch, as Photowalkers, we will probably not want to waste the great weather sitting on our “derrieres”.

Add-on

We’re expecting to add on some stops, but at this time discussions are ongoing.

Return

You can return to your origination via MRT. Dadaocheng is conveniently located between Beimen MRT Station on the Green Line, and Shuanglien MRT Station on the Red Line. You can even walk as far as MinChuan West Road MRT Station on the Red/Orange Lines.

Walk Conditions

This is not a difficult walk, but precautions for rain, heat, & sun are suggested. Shoes need to be comfortable. There’s should be a convenience store stop for essentials (like water, sustenance, and – if necessary – some ice cream). However, it’s expected to be crowded, so photography may be difficult. In crowds, always keep track of your wallet and handbags; pickpockets are rare here, but they do exist.

Weather Links

October weather shouldn’t be too hot, but there is a risk of rain and thunderstorms. Come prepared. In the event of a Typhoon, the walk will be canceled. We will not reschedule this walk, unless we have a reschedule date for the Parade.

Updates

Routes, times & dates may be revised; please keep uptodate with changes as notified in the Event Page. I hope you can come; be nice to see y’all!

Mega Tamsui Photowalk: MRT to Fisherman’s Wharf Updating

Posted in a post in the FB group… stay tuned for more details!

Outline of Walk

Inviting Photowalkers to attend the next Photowalk on June 30th at
3:30pm. We’ll be setting off from outside the main Tamsui Starbucks Coffee Shop @ 3:45pm. If anyone wants to grab a milkshake earlier, please pm me! Kooks is nearby.

Getting There
Take the MRT to the last stop on the Tamsui Line. From Taipei Station, this is usually about 40 minutes or thereabouts.

Start Point
The Tamsui Photowalk is not our first in Tamsui, but the route I’ve chosen will take in as much of the lesser visited alleys/temples/views as possible, but not leave out the famous ones…

Route Plan
On the outward leg, we’ll avoid the Old Street & main street area as much as we can. We’ll take in Qinshui Temple, Danshui Market, Fuyou Temple, back alleys (not marked), Red Castle 1899, the well-known Tamsui Presbyterian Church, the waterfront, old harbor warehouse area (if it’s open), Fort San Domingo, Martyr’s Shrine, Hobe Fort, and finally Cloud Gate Theater. The route is subject to change. The total length is about 3.5km according to Google’s pigeons but the add-on is further and may require a bus trip to complete quickly before sunset.

Add-on
There is an add-on to Fisherman’s Wharf for sunset, but at Photowalkers speeds, we may have to split the group or skip some sections if we dillydally.

Return by Boat
It’s planned to return to the main waterfront via 10-minute boat journey from Fisherman’s Wharf. Then walk along the old street back to the station.

This is not a difficult walk, but precautions for rain, heat, & sun are suggested. Shoes need to be comfortable. There’s should be a convenience store stop for essentials (like water, sustenance, and – if necessary – some beer).

The weather picture is uncertain right now, but will be updated. We’re now in well into Typhoon season, so any storm or heavy rain events means the walk will be postponed until the following week July 7th.

I hope you can come; be nice to see y’all! LMK if I got something wrong…

Links to be advised shortly. Walk routes are currently in the previous post @ https://www.facebook.com/groups/photowalkerstaiwan/permalink/933659816803871/

Weather Links
There is a high risk of rain and thunderstorms on Saturday for most of the afternoon. (link)

Updates

Routes, times & dates may be revised; please keep uptodate with changes as notified in the Event Page. I hope you can come; be nice to see y’all!

Route Maps:

 

The Photowalker Route

Link to Google Map (separate window): Part 1, Part 2, etc.

Suggested List of Stops on the Walk

Stop 1:

Qinshui Temple,
Danshui Market,
Fuyou Temple
Back alleys

Stop 2:

More back alleys (not marked),
Red Castle 1899
Tamsui Presbyterian Church

Stop 3:

  • the waterfront and old harbor warehouse area

Tamsui, formerly the biggest port in Taiwan, was a major center for trading tea, gold, camphor, sugar, wood, coffee, and even opium. Unfortunately, in the later part of the 19th century, the river started silting up, which eventually restricted the size of trading ships from going upstream. While the harbor fell into disrepair, local fishing and tourists continued to sustain the town for a long time. Not coincidentally, the warehouses, piers and harbor facilities all are located nearby. If you check out the movie with Steve McQueen called “The SandPebbles”, you will see shots of the old Douglas warehouses, before they burned down.

Stop 4:

The next four locations offer a variety, so if we don’t have time you can choose your own locations. They’re all pretty close to each other.

  • Fort San Domingo

As you can see, the Red Hair Castle is quite an old building, but you will struggle to see any red hair anywhere. The weird Chinese name for Fort Anthonio (or Fort Santo Domingo) has much to do with the original Dutch settlers who built the first castle in early 17th century. Across South East Asia, the Dutch were referred to as ‘red haired’ because of the genetic trait that meant an awful lot of people in North Western Europe had … RED HAIR! Over the centuries, the castle has been built, repurposed, captured, destroyed, burned down, abandoned, and turned into a museum.

In the 19th and 20th Century, it served as the British Consulate after being captured by the British in the Second Opium War. From 1895 it often changed hands, before falling into disrepair in the 1970’s. Saved by the local government, the castle is regularly invaded by hordes of tourists with selfie sticks. As you enter the consulate building, you might see the letters “VR 1891” inscribed on the pillars, for Queen Victoria. After restoration, the consulate now looks similar to what you might have seen, if you’d visited in 1891.

  • Martyr’s Shrine

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  • Hobe Fort

After the victory, a large fort was constructed to protect the mouth of the river from invaders and attacks. It was part of a national defence initiative across the islands. The first governor of the islands, Liu Ming-Chuan, ordered its construction under German oversight. It was equipped with cannons from Britain and Germany, the placements of which are still visible. You’ll also find tunnels, old mess quarters, and lots of nooks to explore in the fort.

  • Cloud Gate Theater

Text

Add-on Stop 5: Fisherman’s Wharf @ Night

Suggestions for finding opportunities for photographs: don’t be afraid to get lost, don’t worry about catching up with the group, you have the route.

Some may feel that a trip to Fisherman’s Wharf is essential, we’ll probably all end up there at around 6pm. I suggest that we take a taxi there from CloudGate. It’s nearly 3km walk, light will be fading, too. You don’t have to follow the group, in fact members may disperse by themselves. It’s a photowalk, not a parade.

Mini Photowalk:Tokyo Art City June 30th at 9:45am.

Would anyone be interested in checking out this exhibit at Huashan Creative Park on Sunday morning (7/15) at 945am? Details are liable to change or update. Please keep yourself informed.

Outline of Walk

Inviting Photowalkers to attend the next Photowalk on June 30th at 9:45am. We’ll be meeting up at 9:45am. Ticket price is $350… event runs from 10am to 6pm.

Location: https://goo.gl/maps/EFiDN7Mr91F2

Getting There
Take the MRT to the last stop on the ShanTao Temple Station, then walk in an easterly direction towards Huashan Creative Park. From Taipei Station, this is usually about 10 minutes, including an estimated 6 minute walk from the MRT station.

Event
The event is to be held Huashan Creative Park.

Route Plan
No onward route is currently planned, though some options have been mentioned. These include: Gongguan, Treasure Hill, National Taiwan Museum, 228 Park, etc..

This is an easy walk, but precautions for rain, heat, & sun are advised. Shoes need to be comfortable. The weather picture is uncertain right now, but will be updated. We’re now in well into Typhoon season, so any storm or heavy rain events means the walk may be postponed.

Weather Links
There is a risk of rain and thunderstorms for most of the afternoon. (link)

Updates

Routes, times & dates may be revised; please keep uptodate with changes as notified in the Event Page. I hope you can come; be nice to see y’all!

Route Maps & Event Details

 

 

YouthPark to LongShan Temple Photowalk

I was just hashing out the details of the next photowalk on May 27th. Posted in a post in the FB group… stay tuned for more details!

Outline of Walk

Inviting everyone to attend the next Photowalk on May 27th at 4:30pm. We’ll be setting off from Mr. Brown Coffee shop @ 4:45pm, located in Youth Park. I suggest to get to the route embarkation point, take a bus or taxi or uber from your nearest location. Google suggests bus #223 from Taipei Station to Youth Park.

We’ll take in the water features of the Youth Park, Solar LIbrary, etc. before heading to Nanjichang Market for a bite to eat. Then we’ll head upto Wanhua Area, stopping in at Longshan Temple and some nighttime photography on the streets of Wanhau. Hopefully we can catch some sunsets in the park or from higher vantage points in Nanjichang Area. Route: subject to change. The total length is about 3km according to Google’s pigeons.

This is not a difficult walk, but precautions for rain, heat, sun & mosquitoes are suggested. Shoes need to be comfortable. There’s should be a convenience store stop for essentials. Routes, times & dates may be revised; please keep uptodate with changes as notified in the Event Page.

Weather may be stormy in the early afternoon. I hope you can come; be nice to see y’all!

I’ll add references for you later.

Updates

Routes, times & dates may be revised; please keep uptodate with changes as notified in the Event Page. I hope you can come; be nice to see y’all!

Route Maps:

http://www.lookthroughthelens.com/youth-park-photowalk/

The Photowalker Route

Link to Google Map (separate window)

Suggested List of Stops on the Walk

Stop 1: Taipei Youth Park

Taipei Youth Park is located in southern Taipei City near the river, and partly overlies an airport that was called Nanjichang until the end of the 2nd World War. Obviously no planes fly there now, as mass development has occurred on the greenfield site. But Youth Park is a large with multiple facilities to attract people of all age groups. There is a pond, coffee shop, swimming pool, library, and a wide range of sports facilities. It’s ideal for street photography and offers a lot of different possible shooting scenarios. For more information about Taipei Youth Park, check out the link at Taipei City Government.

Stop 2: Nanjichang Night Market

Actually, this is as much a refreshment stop as any. I’ve never visited the nightmarket here at night, though it’s rumored to be much smaller. Since we’ll be hitting dinner time, and we’ll likely be quite hot… I thought it would be a cool place for a quick cup of jelly ball milk tea or other suitable iced snacks. Anyone?

Stop 3: WanHua Station Area

There are a lot of little places near Wanhua Station that we can crawl. The article at EverythingTaiwan.cc suggested these places (thanks to Rick Charette!)

  • Herbal Lane

It might offer some interesting opportunities to explore. But some Chinese medicine vendors are a bit antsy about photography. We can all speculate why, so be careful what photographs you take there.

  • Huaxi Street Tourist Night Market

The same caution may apply here, too. Rumors that the last snake vendors have closed.

  • Bopiliao Historic Block

No comment yet.

  • Xinfu Market

This place might be worth checking out as one of the original clean markets developed in Taipei City way back in the early part of the 20th Century. There are some iconic photograph locations here, too.

  • Xibenyuan Temple Square

Not sure if we’ll get there on this photowalk. It’s a little too far from the Temple.

Stop 4: Longshan Temple

Of course, the pinnacle of the trip will be our arrival at Longshan Temple, perhaps the most famous temple in downtown Taipei with an interesting foundation story that harks back to the founding temple of the same name in China. We’ll likely be arriving after dark, so it could be a little crowded inside. Photography should be possible but you may find slower speeds, narrower F stops, and higher ISO necessary to get the shots. Using a tripod inside the temple may not be possible, due to the danger of tripping.

Stop 5: Wanhua @ Night

We’ll find some streetside and elevated locations for street photography, if anyone’s still got the energy! Matt?

Suggestions for finding opportunities for photographs: don’t be afraid to get lost, don’t worry about catching up with the group, you have the route, we’ll probably all end up at Longshan Temple at around 7pm. You don’t have to follow the group, in fact members may disperse by themselves. It’s a photowalk, not a parade.

Zhonghe’s Little Burma to Hongludi Nanshan Temple Photowalk

Just hashing out the details of the next photowalk on April 29th. Posted in a post in the FB group… stay tuned for more details!

Outline of Walk in Two Parts

Inviting everyone to attend the next Photowalk on April 4, 29th at 4pm. We’ll be setting off from the Starbucks @ MRT Nanshijiao Station exit 4. Just go out of exit 4, turn left and walk straight. Not even 50 meters on the left. You won’t see it immediately because of the obstructed view… keep walking to the edge of the plaza. It’s on your left!

Part 1:
On the route, we’ll take in XingNan Market, 南山放生寺, Hwaxin Street, Hong Ludi Temple and Taipei @ Night. There should be something for everyone during the walk: markets, culture, city, urban, street, food, temples, and even a bit of nature! The route is approx. 4km though we will not be walking all of that. The walk in Zhonghe is approx. 1 hour or so. So if participants want to only do that section, then feel free to disappear at the end of part 1!

Part 2:
From Hwaxin Street, we’ll take a taxi up the mountain because there are almost no direct buses. We’re now looking at a possible bus up, #512. You can, of course, walk or cycle yourself! We may have to walk down! At the top, we’ll visit Hong Ludi Temple and take night views looking over Taipei, weather permitting.

This is not a difficult walk, but precautions for rain & sun are suggested. Shoes need to be sensible too, esp. for slippery or muddy ground. There’s should be a convenience store stop for essentials, esp. since there’s nothing for sale on the mountain. Weather is looking increasingly unsettled for this weekend: Google is predicting 20% chance of rain, no idea if it will be heavy like today. Google’s not known for its accuracy!

Routes, times & dates may be revised; please keep uptodate with changes as notified in the Event Page. I hope you can come; be nice to see y’all!

Updates: There is a bus service that runs down the hill from the temple on Sunday evening. We might be able to catch one going up too…

Maps & Reading
The route map: http://www.lookthroughthelens.com/hongludi-photowalk/(redirect link)

Little Burma @ Synapticism

HongludiTemple Climb

[Image Credit: M940504 CC BY-SA 3.0]

The Photowalker Route

Link to Google Map (separate window)

List of Stops on the Walk

Stop 1: MRT Nanshijiao Station, Terminal Station on the Orange Line.

When you emerge from your train into the subterranean caverns of Nanshijiao Station, you’ll notice large pieces of sculpture suspended over the platform or pinned to the walls of the station. These art pieces were created by the local artist Jun Lai for the station to emphasize the youthful energy of Zhonghe.

There are 12 pieces in the Youth Melody collection located throughout the station, but heading towards Exit 4, you’ll probably only notice a few of them: Melody, With the Wind, and Sky Blue. They’re made of an acrylic/epoxy resin and fixed in place. No! They won’t fall on you!

Stop 2: XingnNan Market

Found right on Xingnan Road, it is one of the smaller nightmarkets, you’ll see plenty of stores offering affordable clothing and night market treats. It’s not one of the best or biggest night markets in New Taipei City, but you’ll find most night market staples there.

Stop 3: Nanshan Temple

It was founded in 1963 and occupies a surprisingly large campus. Of course, given the area that it is near, you’ll notice an emphasis on South East Asia with various sacred relics donated by Burmese followers, Indian Hindu worshippers, and Sri Lankan Buddhists. Features of note: the external wall with 500 statues decorated on it; Bodhi trees; and I’m sure we’ll discover a few other secrets when we’re there.

Stop 4: Hwaxin Street

has been the center of the Burmese community in Taiwan with thousands of residents living there after the end of the Chinese civil war. Many fled Burma and the chaotic struggles it faced and were relocated to this area by the sympathetic KMT government of the time. Hwaxin Street turned into their home away from home with markets, teashops, restaurants, and many other little businesses all located around the area. Though we’re visiting on a Sunday afternoon, I hope we’ll find a few stores/restaurants still open.

After Hwaxin Street, we’ll be looking for the bus stop, checking the bus times and waiting for transport to our final stops. At this point, you may feel you’ve had enough, if the weather’s bad or you’re tired! Please feel free to call it a day!

Stop 5: Hongludi Temple

Perhaps the oldest place in our itinerary today is Zhonghe Hongludi (Earth God Temple) which was originally constructed over 260 years ago and dedicated to the Earth God Fude Jhengshen.

The followers of this sect put up a 109-foot-tall statue in the deity’s image. One dutiful follower noted that she’d visit there every time she found a new job! Just a quick warning: there are over 400 steps that need to be climbed from the parking lot to the top! So gird yerself!

Stop 6: Taipei @ Night

The location of the temple offers a lot of opportunity for city gazing. I hope that we get good weather for doing that. Thanks to Kenny and Josh for helping to plan this trip! Let’s hope we get good weather!